The Spreadsheet of Life

Today we discuss The Spreadsheet of Life.

I posted a screenshot of The Spreadsheet of Life previously, when it was in it’s infancy.  You will see today that, at 3.5 weeks of age, it has matured into quite the chubby-cheeked child.

The Spreadsheet of Life

The Spreadsheet of Life 

Let us now look deep into The Spreadsheet of Life.

In the first three columns are general notes of scheduled events (such as the Indianapolis trip), the number of weeks until the bodybuilding show, and the date (complete with year, in case the current year is forgotten one can only assume).

The fourth column contains Chris’s step count for the day in a color-coded system where medium-green is the optimal color.

I haven’t mentioned Chris’s step counting before so I guess I better briefly explain:  he found a pedometer at his parents’ house last winter and has been wearing it ever since. In my understanding, he shoots for around the recommended 10,000 steps a day but doesn’t go too out of his way if the count falls short. (Sometimes if he’s less than 100 steps away from 10,000 at the end of day, he’ll pace back and forth in our small apartment to get those last steps in, so that’s weird, but it doesn’t happen too often, so it still falls in the “cute and amusing” rather than the “I must get him to stop this” category of significant-other behavior.)

So, back to the step counts on the spreadsheet.  It’s neat to see that the step counts almost doubled when we were in Indianapolis.  Probably all that walking to the bridge (that we ran over quickly) and to CVS for cottage cheese.

In the next column, we see his body weight in kgs. Ha! No, it’s in lbs. Good one huh? I make this hilarious joke because we can see Chris has found it necessary to include units in the headings of all the other measurements in this spreadsheet which is very important in case he were to look back later at say, May 24th, and think he had eaten 244 kg of protein instead of 244 g. Were he later trying to replicate this diet, he would have to eat a large hippopotamus to get 244 kg of protein, which is the exact weight of “Hippopotamus C” in this algebra problem and thus definitely a real hippopotamus weight.

But I digress.

We were discussing the weight (in lbs) column of The Spreadsheet of Life.  The weight loss has been very steady with the exception of the time in Indianapolis when traveling-induced disruptions in the digestive flow, shall we say, probably hampered weight loss a bit.

In the next column, we see Chris’s protein, fat, and carb intakes (in g, not kg) complete with colored bars to visually compare quantity consumed across days.  Next we see calculated Calories, macronutrient percentages, and workouts performed.

My favorite entry in the spreadsheet is on May 20th in the workout column:  “Off (tornado)”. That entry makes me laugh and yet, in a way, it’s profound. That tornado was such a huge event.  But life goes on. Training goes on.  And an unscheduled off-day needs to have a reason recorded next to it in The Spreadsheet of Life. Thus, “Off (tornado)”.

As contest prep progresses, I will post more screenshots of The Spreadsheet of Life as it grows up.